The Gilbert Biomaterials and Regenerative Medicine Laboratory


PEOPLE
Postdoctoral Researchers
Yangping Liu, Ph.D.
Post Doctoral Researcher
Email:

Education
B.S., Materials Science and Engineering, Central South University, China, 2010
Ph.D., Bioengineering, Syracuse University, Syracuse, NY, 2016
Post-doc, U.S. Food and Drug Administration 2017-2018

Research Interests
My research interests include corrosion and tribocorrosion of metallic biomaterials, inflammatory cell-induced corrosion mechanism, electrochemical atomic force microscopy, corrosion and quality assessment of glass vials for pharmaceutical packaging.

Piyush Khullar, Ph.D.
Post Doctoral Researcher
Email:



Education
Ph.D., Materials Science and Engineering, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (2018)
M.S., Mechanical Engineering, Marquette University, Milwaukee, WI (2009)
B.S., Mechanical Engineering, Galgotia College of Engineering & Technology, New Delhi, India (2006)

Research Interests
Working with orthopedic surgeons and immunologists to understand cell interactions at implant interface, role of inflammation response in corrosion and cell induced damage modes with special focus on electrochemistry and materials science. Other efforts include developing a microelectrode setup for retrieval analysis and improving protocol for corrosion testing with human fluids.

Ph.D. Research: DoD funded project that focused on cathodic control of intergranular corrosion in sensitized aluminum 5XXX alloys used for naval ships.

Mike Wiegand, Ph.D.
Post Doctoral Researcher
Email: mwiegan@clemson.edu



Education
B.S. Chemical Engineering, Clarkson University, Potsdam, NY (2013)
M.S. Bioengineering, Syracuse University, Syracuse, NY (2017)
Ph.D., Bioengineering, Clemson University, Charleston, SC (2019)

Research Interests
My research involves looking at inflammatory conditions within the localized environment surrounding metallic implants. I look at different reactive and inflammatory species that are generated either physiologically or by the foreign implant material. These molecules alter the susceptibility and corrosion resistance of implant surfaces, making it a growing concern in our field as well as clinically.

Ph.D. Dissertation: Inflammation and corrosion in total hip prostheses: The generation and interaction of reactive oxygen species with CoCrMo metallic biomaterial surfaces.
Graduate Students
Aarti Shenoy, M.S.
Doctoral Candidate
Email: shenoy@clemson.edu



Education
B.E. Biomedical Engineering, University of Mumbai, Mumbai, India (2012)
M.S. Bioengineering, Syracuse University, Syracuse, NY (2014)

Research Interests
The overarching goal of my work is to understand corrosion mechanisms that occur in orthopedic devices in vivo post-implantation in order to develop effective strategies for mitigating corrosion-related failure. My research interests span various aspects of orthopedic device corrosion, including developing test methods for mechanical and electrochemical evaluation of modular implants, retrieval (failure) analysis of modular implant components and studying immune cell interactions with corrosion byproducts. Specific projects include design and development of a microelectrode technique for retrieval analysis, developing FACS-based assays for studying macrophage response to corrosion byproducts and a mechanical and electrochemical test method for studying acetabular shell-liner performance under cyclic compressive load application.

Stephanie Smith, B.S.
Doctoral Candidate
Email: ss6@clemson.edu



Education
B.S. Bioengineering, Binghamton University, Binghamton, NY (2015)

Research Interests
Currently investigating the role of material compliance in mitigating mechanically assisted crevice corrosion (MACC) at the interfaces of modular taper junctions. We hypothesize that a ‘sticky-compliant’ interface will mitigate the negative effects of MACC by limiting local fretting motion, inhibiting fluid infiltration of the interface, preventing surface oxide film disruption, or a combination of these mechanisms. Specifically, I am testing the effects of different surface topographies, high-performance low-hardness polymeric thin films, and wear-resistant hydrophobic thin films in achieving a more corrosion-resistant implant design.

Dongkai Zhu, M.S.
Doctoral Student

Email: dongkaz@clemson.edu



Education
B.S. Prosthetics and Orthotics, China Capital Medical University, Beijing, China (2013)
M.S. Bioengineering, Syracuse University, Syracuse, NY (2016)

Research Interests
My research focuses on designing and building a 2-dimensional (2D) fretting corrosion system that not only measures and captures electrochemical and mechanical signal during fretting, but also provides direct visualization function making it possible to see what happens in the process (e.g., debris generation.) This system can be used to study fretting corrosion behavior of metallic implant materials, such as 316L stainless steel, Ti6Al4V and CoCrMo alloys. I am currently exploring debris composition and mass loss during fretting corrosion.

Can Aslan, B.S.
Doctoral Student
Email: caslan@clemson.edu



Education
B.S. Biotechnology, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, UK (2008)

Research Interests
My initial doctoral research focused on three-dimensional (3D) printing of bone structures (e.g., vertebra) for orthopedic surgical planning, as well as modification and use of bioprinters to be used in tissue engineering applications. My current research focus involves electrochemical phenomena, mostly corrosion/tribocorrosion, in metal implants: mechanically assisted corrosion in metal implants, and the various effects of combination or assembly of different metals in a single implant (i.e., galvanic coupling.)

Annsley Mace, B.S.
Doctoral Student
Email: amace@clemson.edu



Education
B.S. Chemical and Biological Engineering, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL (2018)

Research Interests
My current research involves using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy to study the corrosion of metallic biomaterials.

Michael Kurtz, B.S.
Doctoral Student
Email: kurtz3@clemson.edu



Education
B.S. Biomedical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology

Research Interests
My current research focuses on parameterizing the selective dissolution of Ti-64 beta phase due to reactive oxygen species.